Friday, November 26, 2010

Our first Bermudian Thanksgiving.



Because one Thanksgiving is not enough. I present, round II of holiday eating. They say most people typically gain one pound per year during the holidays. That one pound remains on them the rest of their life. Multiply that by thirty-eight. Cheers!

This year, Jeff decided his new grill needed a workout. Thus, rotisserie turkey was born.



Look at the intense concentration at work here people. That is some grill master action. And while you're looking, check out the palm trees and fluffy clouds in the bright, blue sky. Don't hate me people. It is what it is, as they say.



I thought it would be appropriate to eat in our dining room. As you can see, it's pretty bare right now; and yes there are still boxes in there. Yes, that is a huge, fake black tarantula sitting on top of a plastic bin. What? You don't have one in your dining room? What's the matter with you?



Who needs decorating when you have a roomful of monkeys to keep you distracted? They provide enough visual (and audio) stimulation.



Plus, we have place cards. Seriously, what else do you need for a holiday table?



Voila! Yes, it is a Christmas tree. We get a little ahead of ourselves sometimes.



Jordan drew individual pictures of each family member and attached it behind the tree, along with our names. I love how creative he is with his art projects. My only directions were "maybe you can make new place cards for us." And off he went.



I just supply the table and supplies. Pay no attention to the open laundry room door. There is nothing to see here, folks. Move along.



Not to be outdone, Mina found creative new uses for the napkin ring holders.



And I ate. Again.



Jordan has a more patient approach. First he examines. Sniffs a bit. Sticks his finger in it...



And if we're lucky, he might actually eat something.



The first Bermudian Thanksgiving was sweet, simple and fun. I still feel like a stranger in a strange new place, which might possibly be how the first celebrants felt when they shared a table with the original Americans. Of course, we've crashed ourselves on a beautiful island, surrounded by the conveniences of the 21st century, so I guess it isn't quite the same. Thank goodness.

Jordan's sign translated:

Dear Mina,

I love to thank you a lot. For the whole world. To thank you for the light, and the water, and have a happy thanksgiving.

Amen.

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